This a QCIF course and places are highly limited as Graduate School is paying the fee. If you are unable to attend, please de-register (or email graduateschool@uq.edu.au if you are unable to do so). An unexplained absence could result in all your future QCIF registrations becoming Waitlisted.

The Unix shell has been around longer than most of its users have been alive. It has survived so long because it’s a power tool that allows people to do complex things with just a few keystrokes. More importantly, it helps them combine existing programs in new ways and automate repetitive tasks so they aren’t typing the same things over and over again. Use of the shell is fundamental to using a wide range of other powerful tools and computing resources (including “high-performance computing” supercomputers). This Software Carpentry workshop will start you on a path towards using these resources effectively.

Recommended Participants

Researchers looking to automate processes or use ‘command line’ research software, including using high performance and parallel computing facilities. No previous Unix or command line experience is required. Do not register unless you can attend both mornings.

About Research software and programming

At UQ, there are many research tools available at your disposal. Preview the available research software and programming languages and learn the pros and cons of each. Investigate how to use them to effectively analyse, manipulate, and visualise your research data.
 

Library workshops

The library offers a range of workshops under the headings below including:

R with RStudio  Excel for research data  NVivo Pro

Useful links

  • Library's software training resources
  • Software carpentry: The open-source movement to teach basic lab skills for research computing.
  • REDCap consortium: A secure web application for building and managing online surveys and databases. UQ is a member of the consortium
  • RStudio cheat sheets
  • Hacky Hour (supported by RCC, QCIF, IMB and wonderful volunteer helpers!): RCC runs consultations every Tuesday at Cafe Nano. Come and ask IT questions such as: getting started with Python and R, stats, machine learning, bio-image, software tools, research data management (RDM), how to access high performance computing, cloud data storage and tools for data cleaning and data visualisation. Bring your project's IT problems or come along as a helper! Very occasionally Hacky Hour may not run; follow us on Twitter (@HackyHourStLuc​) to get the latest announcements. Aside from the usual IT research questions, 
    • First Tuesday of the monthBioinformatics Hacky Hour, ask bioinformatics analysis, software and pipeline questions
    • Last Tuesday of the monthBioLab Hacky Hour, ask about experimental design and technical sample processing questions to get started in the lab